Cheap Replacement Regulator

If it's broken or just needs tweaked

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Volker_P
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Volker_P » Thu Nov 17, 2011 5:26 am

Yes, let's maximize confusion! :lol:

I'd say the left diode triode is for rectification of the regulation voltage signal only: negligible current, no load components required here. Nevertheless it might be important for the regulation voltage level to have the correct component (half-wave) for this regulator type.

The right side rectifies the full charging current and therfore is full-wave.
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forum links to common technical issues

Pinhead
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Pinhead » Thu Nov 17, 2011 2:01 pm

Correct; that is a Ford-style alternator with a separate "sense" wire for an external regulator.

SchoolDaGeek
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby SchoolDaGeek » Mon Nov 21, 2011 9:20 pm

Yes, they are called 36MT160 at www.westfloridacomponents.com
Buy New, Wire Right. BNWR. LOL

kstylian
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby kstylian » Sat Jul 21, 2012 6:03 pm

I bought the Duralast VR650 regulator from AutoZone made to fit a 1976 Porsehe 911. The pinouts are pretty much identical to the OEM honda regulator.

http://www.wellsve.com/custom_searches/showpinoutdiagram.php?partno=VR650#zoom=100

Cut the old harness and splice into the new.

Also ordered a 3-phase 35Amp bridge rectifier from:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/35-AMP-3-THREE-PHASE-BRIDGE-RECTIFIER-WIND-/400182097335?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d2cb635b7

Stator rotor currently in the mail to Tim Parrott.

http://www.tpe-usa.com/

We'll see how this combination works in a couple weeks:)

Pinhead
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Pinhead » Thu Jul 26, 2012 11:38 am

Looks like that should work! I like the simplicity of the Porsche regulator. What are the physical dimensions? It looks like it's quite a bit smaller than the Ford regulator, which would make it much easier to mount under the seat.

The only modification I would do, is run the "ignition" wire through a relay instead of straight from the ignition wire on the harness; there is usually a measurable drop in voltage through the harness which would correspond with an increase in charging voltage. The relay should give the regulator a much closer representation of battery voltage.

kstylian
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby kstylian » Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:06 am

What are the physical dimensions? It looks like it's quite a bit smaller than the Ford regulator, which would make it much easier to mount under the seat.


It is quite a bit smaller than the OEM R/R. I'm hoping to mount the new regulator and 3-phase rectifier in the same OEM location. I'll post pics when complete.

Regarding running the ignition through a seperate relay, I've already wired up the new R/R with the old connectors. I'm currently going through and cleaning all electrial contacts, so hopefully overcharging will not be an issue.....crossing fingers.

grankin01
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby grankin01 » Wed Aug 01, 2012 1:07 pm

Hello all!

I registered a little while ago and have been lurking. ;) First, great post Pinhead!

I have implemented the new R/R setup with the VR730 (IASF) and a BWD SC5 rectifier bridge. There have been a few issues with getting it to work though. I believe I have isolated the problem and it has nothing to do with the R/R setup. My rotor was testing at 0.9 ohms until I cleaned it with 220 grit sand paper and QD contact cleaner. Then it tested to 0.5 ohms. So ... I have a fried rotor. The reason I am posting this is that I was following the Clymer manual's test parameters and believed everything was rosy. It showed that Honda had not released a specific impedance value for the rotor but that it should be very low. Around 0.4 to 0.5 ohms. After some searching and frying two regulators (one VR730 and a VR650 which Autozone graciously allowed me to return) I decided to dig further. My investigation came up with something I knew was possible but hadn't seen in a manual before yet ... a typo (live and learn, right ;)). Rotor resistance values that I have seen as known good from online sources show (correct me if I am wrong please) around 4 to 7 ohms.

So, long story short, if you have a Clymer manual you need to do some pen and ink changes to the rotor testing procedures and parameters. Otherwise, you may find yourself with regulators that self destruct when you try to apply power to the system and/or run the bike to check if your hard work has payed off. I only mention it here because I haven't seen it mentioned on this thread yet (it is mentioned on the other forum ;)).

Cheers and good luck all!

Guy

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Volker_P
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Volker_P » Wed Aug 01, 2012 1:52 pm

Welcome here! :D

grankin01 wrote: The reason I am posting this is that I was following the Clymer manual's test parameters and believed everything was rosy. It showed that Honda had not released a specific impedance value for the rotor but that it should be very low. Around 0.4 to 0.5 ohms.

This is stator resistance data between all yellow cables.

grankin01 wrote: Rotor resistance values that I have seen as known good from online sources show (correct me if I am wrong please) around 4 to 7 ohms.

Correct

grankin01 wrote: I only mention it here because I haven't seen it mentioned on this thread yet (it is mentioned on the other forum ;)).

All right.
Well, did you clean out your tank? :lol:
Cosky's great (free) online manual: http://cosky0.tripod.com

forum links to common technical issues

grankin01
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby grankin01 » Wed Aug 01, 2012 2:02 pm

Volker_P wrote:Welcome here! :D

grankin01 wrote: The reason I am posting this is that I was following the Clymer manual's test parameters and believed everything was rosy. It showed that Honda had not released a specific impedance value for the rotor but that it should be very low. Around 0.4 to 0.5 ohms.

This is stator resistance data between all yellow cables.

All right.
Well, did you clean out your tank? :lol:


The Clymer manual does show stator resistance as 0.41 ~ 0.51 between the phase wires. So the numbers are very close but in the rotor testing section it does, in fact, show a resistance of about 0.4 ~ 0.5 after saying that it isn't specified but should be very low. It's not just misleading. It's just plain wrong. I should point out that this is a Clymer manual for 79-82 CB650 Fours. Manual number is M336 (page 223) if you'd like to verify so people don't make the same mistake (repeatedly ... gerrr) that I did. ;)

And yes, after some cursing I cleaned my tank out. :lol:

Thanks for the welcome BTW! :D

waynecomp
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby waynecomp » Fri Aug 10, 2012 4:32 pm

Hi. This is my first post, but I have been benefiting from the info here for weeks.
I'm wondering if anyone can tell me if I should expect any trouble from this rectifier.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/35A-1000V-3-Pha ... 2a214e12b9

does a higher peak voltage make it ineffective at the low voltage of the charging system?
Through our inability to accept personal responsibility, we were actually creating our own problems.

Pinhead
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Pinhead » Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:43 pm

waynecomp wrote:Hi. This is my first post, but I have been benefiting from the info here for weeks.
I'm wondering if anyone can tell me if I should expect any trouble from this rectifier.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/35A-1000V-3-Pha ... 2a214e12b9

does a higher peak voltage make it ineffective at the low voltage of the charging system?


Looks like that'll work pretty well.

waynecomp
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Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2012 5:42 pm
Location: Pembroke, Massachusetts

Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby waynecomp » Fri Aug 10, 2012 10:52 pm

Looks like that'll work pretty well.

great! I also recently saw a wiring diagram with a diode trio inline befor the rectifier. what does this accomplish exactly? has anyone tried this?
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Through our inability to accept personal responsibility, we were actually creating our own problems.

Pinhead
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Pinhead » Mon Aug 13, 2012 10:10 am

waynecomp wrote:
Looks like that'll work pretty well.

great! I also recently saw a wiring diagram with a diode trio inline befor the rectifier. what does this accomplish exactly? has anyone tried this?


The image is too small for me to decipher...

waynecomp
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Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby waynecomp » Mon Aug 13, 2012 10:31 pm

The image came from page 4 of the shoc4, forum on cheap regulator/rectifier.
Here's the link
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic ... #msg420185

I would ask at that forum but I'm still waiting on my verification e mail to join.
Through our inability to accept personal responsibility, we were actually creating our own problems.

Pinhead
Posts: 611
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 2:26 am

Re: Cheap Replacement Regulator

Postby Pinhead » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:56 pm

waynecomp wrote:The image came from page 4 of the shoc4, forum on cheap regulator/rectifier.
Here's the link
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic ... #msg420185

I would ask at that forum but I'm still waiting on my verification e mail to join.


The diode trio is a half-wave rectifier. The current from the diode trio flows through the 40 ohm resistor. This current produces a voltage across the resistor, which can be used for a charging indicator (charge/discharge vs a voltage gauge).


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